Addressing stigma is critical to containing the monkeypox outbreak

Inaccurate media coverage of the monkeypox outbreak has resulted in misinformation about the many ways it can be spread, resulting in stigma (shaming and biased attitudes) toward people who develop the disease. Nurses play a key role in delivering appropriate care related to monkeypox by creating safe spaces for affected individuals regardless of sexual behaviors, […]

Continue Reading

Novel PET imaging agent detects earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease

A new highly selective PET imaging agent can detect the presence of overexpressed monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) in cognitively unimpaired individuals with high beta amyloid (Ab)—one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease—according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The radiotracer, 18F-SMBT-1, allows for a better understanding of the […]

Continue Reading

Individuals experiencing food insecurity likely to binge eat when food is available

Young adults experiencing food insecurity may be prone to binge eating in times when food is available, according to a new study from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SPH). SPH researchers found support for the “feast or famine” cycle hypothesis in food-insecure households. Findings from their study are consistent with the idea […]

Continue Reading

New online map presents snapshots of osteoporosis in 29 European countries

Osteoporosis is a serious and growing healthcare problem in Europe, resulting in more than 4.3 million fragility fractures and enormous healthcare costs in excess of €56 billion annually. Nevertheless, it remains vastly underdiagnosed and undertreated, with an estimated 71% of European women at high risk not receiving preventative treatment. To put a spotlight on the […]

Continue Reading

An unlikely culprit poses contamination risk during food preparation

A study on the potential for cross-contaminating kitchen surfaces with pathogens during food preparation has pointed to an unlikely culprit for spreading sickness: spice containers. Detailing findings in the Journal of Food Protection, Donald Schaffner, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Food Science at the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences who co-authored […]

Continue Reading

Corrupt endothelial cells found to protect blood cancer cells from chemotherapy

Endothelial cells—the cells that line blood vessels—grown alongside leukemia cells become corrupted and rescue the cancer cells from many chemotherapy drugs, a study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators found. A growing body of evidence suggests that genetic mutations are not enough to cause cancer; tumor cells also need the right environment to grow. The new […]

Continue Reading